East Bay Rowing Club on TV!

National Learn to Row Day is one of the most important days in the calendar for the East Bay Rowing Club. The 2017 edition did not disappoint, with a sold out event, a boathouse full of rowers, and a slightly overcast day that made midday rowing a little more forgiving.

Continue reading…


The Mystery of The Watermelon

Summer on the Estuary means more daylight rowing and long, steady pieces as far as we can go. Continue reading…


Another day, another sunrise

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(Featured as the row2k Picture of the Day on February 6, 2015.)


Learn To Row – January 11, 2015

DSC_0067Looking for a little adventure to kick off 2015?  How about learning to row? Come on down to the boathouse on Sunday, January 11, for our first Learn to Row (LTR) of the year. Continue reading…


Women masters enjoy expert coaching workshops

Periodically, our Women Masters team enjoys special rowing skills workshops with some of the best coaches in the country. Last spring, two boats of mostly advanced women’s team members participated in a great two-day workshop with renowned coach Mayrene Earl. Just recently, Saturday August 17, 2014, two boats of mostly intermediate rowers spent a day with Deirdre McLoughlin, voted last year’s Fans Choice Coach of the Year at the prestigious Golden Oars awards and former Marin Rowing Masters women’s coach. Deirdre’s approach is fun and informal, with a focus on the fundamentals of stroking technique — quick bodies over, relaxed inboard arm, quick catches and ‘working with what you got’ — not overcompensating with too much reach at the catch, which causes ‘check’ and slows the forward motion of the boat. Deirdre is also an outstanding PT and she spent time teaching us basic body dynamics for lifting boats and avoiding injury. Finally, all rowers were videotaped and given specific critiques for areas to work on — head down, inboard arm relaxed, pull in high [no dumping into my lap] for me.

A fun and fantastic experience!

-Kathy Eyre


EBRC Learn to Row Day : July 20th

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Come one, come all down to the boat house on Saturday, the 20th of July for our second Learn to Row (LTR) of the Summer. We’re going to be going over standard rowing terminology, proper use of a land rower aka ergometer, take some strokes on the Oakland Estuary and learn all about the sport.

The EBRC Learn To Row Class will be held on Saturday, July 20th, from 10am to 1pm.
Jack London Aquatic Center
115 Embarcadero
Oakland, CA 94607
 
For more information or to reserve your spot, please contact info@eastbayrowingclub.org

Our two-week LTR program will begin that following Monday the 22nd for all novice men, and the 23rd for all novice women. The two week learn to row class extends until August 3rd.

See you down at the boathouse!


Proposed Oakland Boathouse-to-Boathouse Race

Connecting the Lake to the Bay
Connecting the Lake to the Bay

Great publicity this week about the opening of the channel by Lake Merritt (thanks, Measure DD!). As a former LMRC member, I can attest firsthand about what grand tradition they have, seeped in 100 years of history. One of the oldest clubs on the West Coast, the LMRC has been cordoned off in their landmass-surrounded lake for their entire existence, the dam having been implemented 150 years ago (thanks, Sam Merritt!).

LMRC has been a great sister club to the EBRC. We relied on them physically and mentally to get through the times when our location and club status was still uncertain. With Lake Merritt, still home of the SW Regionals, there was only the possibility for about 100-125 strokes before you had to spin your boat and go back the other way. Now, with the gradual opening of the channel over the next few years, the possibility for a unique sprint course presents itself.

A boathouse-to-boathouse journey back into the history of Oakland, the community and the bay. What will start at the boathouse of Lake Merritt will end at the boathouse of the boathouse of the EBRC. I present to you now, rowing community, the first draft of the Lake-to-Estuary Race.

[youtube height=”305″ width=”520″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8S5vZMUqpw&feature=youtu.be[/youtube]
  1. Starting at the Southeast end of the lake, the timed heats begin. Southwest finger will be for warm-ups and staging.
  2. Dodging the flock of ever-present Canadian Geese that hang out by the fountain, the boats first wind their way to the around the Fairyland area.
  3. Once in the center of the lake, the boats begin to position for a wide right turn to go under the 12th Street bridge, to the sound of hundreds of screaming, cheering fans.
  4. The boats continue down the channel, past Merritt college, the track stadium, baseball field and Knickerbocker’s Bend.
  5. Rowers will be able to see the bay as they hit Stelter’s Strait, continuing on under 880 until the furious reach the Jack London Aquatic Center (EBRC boathouse) where they will weave their way out to the estuary.
  6. A final right turn awaits them, setting themselves up for the sprint the flagpole in Jack London square, where more legions of screaming fans await to grant them their deserved glory. Google Earth tells me this is just over about 3500 meters, a perfect ‘short head’ or ‘long sprint’.




As the changes from Measure DD continue to take effect, bridges will be raised and the waters of the lake will creep closer to those of the estuary. We’re looking forward to many more celebration days together as these barriers between are brought down.